Tithing Settlement 2008

December 11, 2008 | 8 comments
By

Tithing Settlement is a great part of the Christmas season.

Two things happened this year, one good and one bad. The good one was this: we got ought the girls’ piggy bank and emptied it and separated out the coins and had them put the coins back in, counting to 9, and them put a tenth coin in a pile for Jesus. We were waiting for the littlest to wake up.

When she finally did, I told my wife I had an eerie feeling that we still had a kid we needed to wake up. She told me that she gets that feeling a lot at spiritual moments. She said she thought the Holy Ghost was close because we’d been teaching our girls to pay tithing and that when the Holy Ghost was close was when we would most notice the absence of our oldest, Betsey Pearl.

The bad was this: I didn’t go over the record the Bishop gave me as carefully as in year’s past because I figured as long as I actually paid it can’t really matter what the record shows I paid. But I left tithing settlement with a spiritually flat feeling. Recordkeeping is apparently more sacred to God than I’m disposed to want it to be.

Here’s last year’s Tithing Settlement post:
The Feast of Saint Tithing Settlement.


Comment warning.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

8 Responses to Tithing Settlement 2008

  1. Benjamin on December 11, 2008 at 4:10 pm

    Wow, Adam. I, similarly, gave the record received from the bishop no more than a quick glance. I walked right out there without even considering how I felt or whether or not it mattered to the Lord that was what on the record (as opposed to what I had actually paid, if there had been a discrepancy) was correct. Thank you for reminding me (and others) to stop and think of tithing settlement as an opportunity for spiritual experiences rather than a necessary formality that comes around each December.

  2. Rob Perkins on December 11, 2008 at 6:36 pm

    I’ve never considered the actual number nearly as important as whether or not the number was a full tithe; our records have been perfectly accurate for 15 years, thanks to the care my wife takes in maintaining them. But I suppose it’s more correct to consider the records important: Jesus Himself reproved the surviving Nephites for not having entered something into the records they were keeping, and he waited until they did it. So, in one sense, the lesson is right there in 3 Nephi.

  3. Adam Greenwood on December 11, 2008 at 7:54 pm

    Thanks, Benjamin.

    Rob P., I think you’re on to something. I hadn’t considered the 3 Nephi connection.

  4. Kathryn Soper on December 12, 2008 at 10:36 am

    All I can think about at tithing settlement is my husband’s idea to expedite matters: a drive-thru window in the Bishop’s office.

    Would you like to supersize that offering?

    (he was clerk for 4 years, now 2nd counselor)

    Seriously, though, tithing settlement is an annual frustration, because the bishopric basically has to hound half the ward to sign up (and actually show up). imo, tithing settlement should be handled like temple recommend interviews: If it’s important to you, you’ll make sure you get yourself there. If it’s not important to you, it’s your loss. All the bishopric should have to do is announce which dates are available, and make special arrangements with anyone who asks.

  5. The Only True and Living Nathan on December 12, 2008 at 1:04 pm

    Seriously, though, tithing settlement is an annual frustration, because the bishopric basically has to hound half the ward to sign up (and actually show up). imo, tithing settlement should be handled like temple recommend interviews: If it’s important to you, you’ll make sure you get yourself there. If it’s not important to you, it’s your loss. All the bishopric should have to do is announce which dates are available, and make special arrangements with anyone who asks.

    That’s all our bishopric has done.

  6. Rldds on December 12, 2008 at 5:57 pm

    We have simply announced it from the pulpit in sacrament meeting a coulple of times and had sign up sheets in the clerk’s office. I appreciate those who sign up and want to come in to visit/declare their tithing status, but would never “hound” anyone to come in.
    It’s been a real pleasure to visit with many who normally have no need to visit with their bishop.

  7. GatoraAdeMomma on December 14, 2008 at 11:52 am

    Our stake policy is not to have sign-up lists as members loose confidentiality (who has signed up, who hasn’t). The members have to see the execuitve secy to make an appointment and likewise he has been assigned to contact all members for fill slots. Lots of leg work, lots of no shows. The bishops are getting smarter and taking out-of-town Christmas vacations as soon as school is out.

  8. zionssuburb on December 14, 2008 at 7:16 pm

    As a clerk and an execsec, what I’ve done is taken the list of those who have made any kind of dontation, and then asked the Bishop who else he would like to visit with for Tithing Settlement. I then assign time slots, and a letter is mailed to each person with a personalized invitation. We still have our typical cancellations, but there is always a 20%-25% increase in attendance.

    -John

WELCOME

Times and Seasons is a place to gather and discuss ideas of interest to faithful Latter-day Saints.