Blog Archives

Anti-Gay Violence and Church Belief

January 26, 2005 | 112 comments
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We seem to discuss issues of homosexuality ad nausum around here. Surprisingly, one particular subtopic that hasn’t really come up in the past is the real problem of anti-gay violence. Read more »

Interesting Site: Urban Legends Repository

January 20, 2005 | 19 comments
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We all hear members who say “well, you can’t do X because there’s a letter from Spencer W. Kimball on it . . .” It’s an interesting problem — how to treat statements of dubious provenance such as ostensibly-from-the-leaders, no-longer-publicized statements. A related issue is finding out if these statements even really exist. A church member named David Bowie (no, not the rocker) has an interesting online collection of “Disputed Mormon Texts” — texts that may seem to be urban legends. Thus far, he has verified a few as authentic (like the 1910 statement on evolution) and a few... Read more »

Guest Blogger: Eric James Stone

January 19, 2005 | 3 comments
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We’re happy to announce our latest guest blogger, Eric James Stone. Read more »

Just a Quick Note

January 18, 2005 | no comments
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If you follow the links in William Morris’s post, you’ll note that the deadline is fast approaching for paper submissions for the AML conference. So if you’re sitting on that brilliant analysis of feminist themes in The Work and the Glory, now’s a good time to dust it off and send it in to AML. Read more »

The 50 Book Challenge

January 18, 2005 | 59 comments
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Will Baude discusses something called the 50 book challenge, with the idea being to read 50 books this year and blog about them. Not a bad idea. Read more »

Laughter

January 18, 2005 | 31 comments
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Don’t laugh. Especially not on Sunday. The Doctrine and Covenants makes this pretty clear: And that thou mayest more fully keep thyself unspotted from the world, thou shalt go to the house of prayer and offer up thy sacraments upon my holy day . . . And inasmuch as ye do these things with thanksgiving, with cheerful hearts and countenances, not with much laughter, for this is sin, but with a glad heart and a cheerful countenance Read more »

Hymns that Need to Go

January 17, 2005 | 212 comments
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Now for a fun project — let’s rewrite the hymn book! In particular, let’s discuss a few hymns which (in a perfect world) might be headed for the chopping block. Read more »

Why “Remove This Cup”?

January 14, 2005 | 32 comments
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Over the past few days, I’ve been discussing the atonement with a Catholic friend. We’ve been comparing the different ideas our two faiths have (he’s fascinated, for instance, by the primacy that Mormons give to Gethsemane). One issue that has arisen, and that I don’t have a good answer for, is this — why does Jesus ask for the cup to be removed? Read more »

The Uneasy Case for Janice Kapp: A (sort of) defense of Mormon Pop

January 11, 2005 | 210 comments
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I’ll preface this by noting that it is axiomatic that I am nowhere near as cool as Greg Call. I’m not as cool as William Morris, either, and I’m not really as cool as Kristine, even if she does like Abba. I like to think that I’m as cool as D. Fletcher, but I’m probably wrong there too. The fact is, I’m probably not cooler than anyone — Nate Oman and Steve Evans aside, of course. But enough is enough. Read more »

A Sweet Offer

January 10, 2005 | 28 comments
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Over on the film thread, a minor side question has arisen over which is the best chocolate: Dutch, Swiss, or Belgian, (or perhaps another?). These discussions are always interesting. However, as we all know, contention is of the devil. So, out of a heartfelt desire to help quell any contention, I’m willing to do my part to help try to resolve the question of which is the best chocolate. If everyone will just send me a sample of the kind that they believe is best, I promise to taste them all, and then report with results. Read more »

Brief “Operation Give” Update

January 7, 2005 | no comments
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LDS philanthropic organizer Chief Wiggles (who runs the charity “Operation Give”) has been on a roll recently. First, he has posted pictures last week of the Iraqi toddler who, though Op Give’s efforts, was flown to the U.S. for life-saving surgery. She’s doing just fine. Now, he’s lined up a Fed Ex plane ready to fill with help for tsunami victims. As usual, it’s a great cause. They’ve got suggestions and instructions for anyone who’s interested in donating. As for me, there’s a Rite Aid across the street, and I think I’m going to make a visit and put... Read more »

What ever happened to instantaneous healings?

January 7, 2005 | 77 comments
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We read in the scriptures about people raised from the dead. We read of blind men and lame men instantly cured of their afflictions. And we read in church history of miraculous healings by early leaders like Joseph Smith. Read more »

Kids’ Testimonies – Last Sunday

January 6, 2005 | 25 comments
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Last week we were over at a friend’s house and the missionaries stopped by. They gave the usual spiritual thought, and challenged us all to bear our testimonies this week. It worked. But the most surprising part was that my kids also participated. Read more »

Flouridation

January 5, 2005 | 33 comments
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Always a hot topic among Mormons. Discuss. Read more »

The Wackiness of Mormon Teen Dating Rituals

January 5, 2005 | 34 comments
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Rebecca is discussing the wackiness of Mormon teen dating rituals. “Dating was a serious of creative ideas that ended revealing who it was that was asking me out,” she writes. “Is this stuff uniquely Utah?” Well, I can attest that these rituals extend at least to the quasi-Utah of Mesa, Arizona. I remember them well. Read more »

The Mormon Church is for Sale. On eBay.

January 3, 2005 | 17 comments
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I just noticed this: Go to Philocrites’ blog and look at the google ads on the sidebar. (The ads run according to some pre-set computer algorithms that advertise for things relating to the topics discussed.) This particular post discusses a Mormon baptism, and the ads included, on a recent viewing, links to “Mormon dating” . . . “Mormon beliefs Biblical?” . . . “Mormon dating” again . . . so far, so good — ads for the kinds of things one would expect the algorithm to come up with. And then we get to: “Mormon Church for Sale. Discount... Read more »

Blogwatch 1/3/05

January 3, 2005 | 9 comments
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Announcements of new bloggernacle blogs are about as rare as birth announcements in a student ward. Or dating melodrama in a singles ward. Or semi-apostate ramblings in your ward’s geriatric section high priests group. Pick your metaphor. In any event, some recent new arrivals to the ‘nacle that I’ve noticed include: -Various Stages of Mormondom looks interesting. Read more »

John Leo, Sloppy Journalism, and Anti-Christmas (Mythical?) Anecdotes

January 3, 2005 | 43 comments
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In his most recent anti-PC rant, U.S. News columnist John Leo applies his characteristic sarcastic outrage to a subject that he loves to pontificate about — the problems of “PC” behavior. Christmas is being banned — or so Leo would have us believe. But Leo’s piece is sadly lacking in specific facts to substantiate that claim, as the most cursory examination of his piece makes clear. Read more »

“Liberals,” “Tolerance,” and Other Canards of the Right

December 30, 2004 | 61 comments
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Over at A Bird’s Eye View, I’ve been having a conversation in comments with John Fowles. In one comment, John castigates a student who made a remark that he viewed as derogatory towards Mormons. John writes: “If she is ‘liberal’ doesn’t that mean she is supposed to be ‘sensitive’? Or does that only mean she is sensitive to the favored social causes and minorities and intolerant towards others?” Ahh, where to begin? Read more »

Judge Posner on Faith Based Morality and Public Policy

December 27, 2004 | 60 comments
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Judge Richard Posner — one of the most influential judges of the past several decades — is guest blogging on professor Brian Leiter’s blog. His first post deals with faith-based morality and how this affects public policy. (A topic that T & S readers will recognize as familiar — we discuss it a lot around here). Judge Posner suggests that: “If the population is religious, religion will influence morality, which in turn will influence law, subject to constitutional limitations narrowly interpreted to protect the handful of rights that ought not to be at the mercy of the majority.” Instead... Read more »

Ender’s Game as Mormon Literature

December 21, 2004 | 82 comments
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Unless you’ve been living in a cave for the past twenty years, you’ve probably heard of Orson Scott Card. He’s a Mormon author who primarily writes science fiction. And he’s a very good author — to this day, his best work, Ender’s Game (which won Hugo and Nebula awards) is considered one of the better sci-fi novels of the past quarter century. Of course, Card’s Mormon background raises the question of what we can learn by viewing Ender’s Game as Mormon literature. Read more »

Christmas songs: Navidad Sin Ti

December 21, 2004 | 5 comments
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In this time of the year, we hear lots of Christmas songs. There’s one song in particular that I’ve come to enjoy hearing around Christmas, though at one time I never thought this would be possible. The song is “Navidad Sin Ti” by the Ranchera music group (essentially country music in Spanish) Los Bukis. Read more »

Around the Blogs: Planet LDS

December 20, 2004 | one comment
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I just noticed (via A Soft Answer) a new bloggernacle aggregation blog — Planet LDS, at KZION. The site includes feeds from almost 50 bloggernaclites, including Times and Seasons. Techies will note that this aggregation is identical to what anyone can do with an aggregator (for example, the free one at Bloglines). However, Planet LDS’s pre-set aggregation blog is a useful fill-in for any readers too busy, lazy, or Luddite to set up their own aggregators. Caveat: For those who don’t know, let me note that there is an important limitation if you’re reading Planet LDS instead of setting... Read more »

A Mormon Reinterpretation of a Christmas Carol

December 15, 2004 | 9 comments
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Today I heard a well-known Christmas carol, and it occurred to me that the carol’s underlying story was incredibly ahistorical. In fact, it is roughly the opposite of what we know happened. Or rather, it is roughly the opposite of what most Christians know happened. Read more »