Blog Archives

A technical hiccough

November 2, 2004 | 13 comments
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Our internet host is having some problems keeping up with traffic on this incredibly busy day. The problem is exacerbated since they’re also hosting some official election supervisor sites in Florida. We’ve had one hiccough so far today — about an hour and a half of down time — and we may see more. Just an FYI. Read more »

Quick note

November 2, 2004 | 2 comments
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We’ve been getting a ton of spam lately from a new batch of spammers using new .info sites. So I just added a general moderation rule for any .info sites. I also added a specific unblock for danithew’s site — his posts should go through okay. I don’t think we have any other real commenters who use .info sites. If so, I can unblock them as well. (And this isn’t a true block, it just directs these comments into the moderation queue for individual approval or deletion). Read more »

Another technical problem

October 17, 2004 | 7 comments
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There seems to be a minor bug in one of the comment scripts, which is causing error messages when people enter comments. As usual, our crack team of elite experts (hah!) is investigating. In the meantime, as far as we can tell, all comments are going through just fine — it’s just giving an error message afterwards. So rest easy, your comment should be fine. And we’ll get this fixed, like all of the other little bugs that crop up around here from time to time. Read more »

Attacked by the forces of evil

September 25, 2004 | 7 comments
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We have been infected with spyware. I’m working on eradicating it. It’s gone. Read more »

Blogroll changes

September 17, 2004 | 2 comments
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Over the next little while, I’m going to be trying to implement the new blogroll feature from WordPress. There will be a bit of lag time as we get our blogroll moved over. During this lag, the new blogroll will only be partially complete. However, it should load a lot faster as it’s not getting data from two other websites. Read more »

Kaimi Blows up the Blog, Again

September 17, 2004 | 4 comments
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Apologies to all who have tried to comment this morning. Kaimi was messing with comment moderation settings (where we can put “questionable” comments into a queue for individual approval) and accidentally added an extra blank line to the list of questionable comment flags. The software apparently interpreted this as a blank space, so any comment with a space in it was marked questionable. This has been fixed, and everyone’s “questionable” comments have been released from comment jail. (I hear they’re considering a class action lawsuit, alleging unconstitutional conditions). Read more »

Filtering software

September 11, 2004 | 9 comments
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We’ve just got a new filtering software, WP-Blacklist, installed. This should save the bloggers lots of time and energy deleting spam. Filtering software is an imperfect tool. Kaimi just noticed fixed a bug in the software that caused certain entries with multiple dashes to erroneously show up as spam. If anyone notices any other glitches or problems commenting, please let us know. (Thanks!) Meanwhile, if anyone wants to see what happens to comment spammers, try making the following comment. “online-casino” . Enjoy! Read more »

It’s 4 p.m. Do you know where your blogchildren are?

September 9, 2004 | 12 comments
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Readers may have noticed a new feature on the sidebar — under the blogroll, we’ve got a link to a list of our blogchildren. What are blogchildren? As noted in the link, they are the “blogs and bloggers who have stated that they were inspired to start blogging after reading Times and Seasons, and/or who have stated that they modeled their blogs (in whole or in part) after T & S.” Read more »

Move to Word Press

September 3, 2004 | 32 comments
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I think this is now running. It looks like we just plain outgrew MT. I guess all of the earlier time outs were a warning. Apparently, it doesn’t handle particularly well when there are 1000 entries and 20,000 comments (3 MB of entries and 20 MB of comments). I would have preferred to have kept things in MT, having already done a lot of work in that software, but it looks like we hit the limit. There are still some changes to be made. Read more »

Protected: 12 Questions Schedule

September 1, 2004 | no comments
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There is no excerpt because this is a protected post. Read more »

Guest Blogging Schedule

September 1, 2004 | no comments
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================================ Scheduled: Carol Armga: May 1-14 Patrick Mason: June 12-26 Jonathan Green: July 7-21 Carrie Lundell: August 1-15 Jill Mulvay Derr: End of August ================================ Accepted invitation, no date yet set: Jeremiah John (Adam) (on long-term hold) Laurel Thatcher Ulrich (Julie) Terryl Givens (Fall) (Jim) Jon Wilson (aka Ebenezer Orthodoxy) (Matt) Aaron Brown (Matt) Richard Oman (Nate) ================================ Invited, awaiting response: Mother of Ebenezer Orthodoxy Rob Daines? ================================ Approved by bloggers, not yet invited: Rob Fergus (post-post-post-election) Brother Haglund Sally Gordon Brent Andrewsen? Sarah Aldo Edwards Gray & Young (12Q?) Kristin Smith Dayley Christine Durham (12Q?) ================================ Invited, not... Read more »

Quick Note on the Blogroll

April 18, 2004 | 4 comments
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We’re trying out Bloglines, which has some advantages over our old blgoroll program, Blogrolling. For example, it allows us to categorize blogs. Also, it allows us to read posts in one place (aggregation). It has a few differences, however. The main difference is that it requires an RSS feed. Non-RSS blogs are, for the moment, clumped together in a group at the end of the blogroll. In addition, I should note that (1) The determinations of category were made on the fly by Kaimi, and should not be viewed as etched in stone. If you think that your blog... Read more »

Another Request for Technical Assistance

March 22, 2004 | 4 comments
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Since the last request for technical assistance was a resounding success, I’m hoping to duplicate the feat. The current question involves a moderately advanced (or at least, beyond my current skill) movable type question and a bit of HTML (the query string function). Here goes: Read more »

That Smile

January 14, 2004 | 8 comments
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Have you seen “The Mona Lisa Smile?” I loved it. Not only was it at my beloved Alma Mater, the most beautiful campus in the U.S., but showed it when I was there. Long, long ago. Not everyone loved the film. My classmates are planning to sue the producers for devaluing their education. But it was accurate in spirit if not in detail. Read more »

Church on Sunday

January 13, 2004 | 3 comments
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We meet in a city structure six stories high which has been home to eight units, manageable when we had two chapels. When a temple using all of the fifth and sixth floors and parts of the first and second floors began to take shape in the building, chaos ensued. The three single wards met together (stake conf. every Sunday) and a family ward, a Spanish branch, and a deaf unit began to meet together, every space used at all hours. A new and different church with many things going on that never used to. For me, the transformation... Read more »

Church on Saturday

January 12, 2004 | 35 comments
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On Saturday I went to an LDS stake leadership meeting via satellite. I soon realized that I wasn’t too interested in the two major messages, the importance of trying to preserve the family and the subordination of all Church auxiliaries to the priesthood. I’ve heard those a few times. I remain unconvinced that Jehovah and Joseph Smith were advocating marriage and the family as we know them, and being an old auxiliary leader, I know that it is unwise to expect much help from the priesthood. Read more »

Writing Our Lives

January 8, 2004 | 12 comments
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Every day for the year of 2003 I read a diary entry by Samuel Pepys, the incomparable 17th century English diarist. The ten-year Pepys diary is being put online a day at a time by Phil Gyford, a British computer person, (www.pepysdiary.com) and the international community that has gathered and comments on the daily entries is similar to this, a tight ingrown, but very learned and witty group. Read more »

Mormonism and Evolution

January 7, 2004 | 21 comments
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Evolution has been a topic of much debate in many Christian churches, including the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church). Members fall into various categories: those who reject evolution outright, those that accept some principles of evolution, and those that accept the theory of evolution in its entirety thus far. I fall into the middle camp since I accept some principles of evolution such as adaptation and natural selection, but I find some parts of the theory problematic. However, I believe that the theory of evolution is currently the best scientific theory that attempts... Read more »

On Being a Female LDS Scientist

December 15, 2003 | 14 comments
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So where do I begin? First of all, there are not many LDS scientists to begin with and I?m not exactly sure why. There are approximately 2000 LDS scientists currently according to this link. I don?t know how many of those are women. What?s interesting is that Utah produces more scientists per capita than any other state for the last 60 yrs, 75% of whom are LDS. Of these, 83% percent classified themselves as strong believers and 90% of these felt that their religious beliefs and science theories could be harmonized. I think these statistics show that there is... Read more »

Matt Evans

January 1, 2003 | no comments
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Matt Evans

I grew up in Salt Lake City, the oldest of seven kids in a single-parent home. I served a mission in southern Spain and north Africa.  Shortly after returning home I married Lori Middleton, and we put ourselves through school, working and earning odd scholarships.  I graduated from the University of Utah with degrees in Political Science and Sociology, and from Harvard Law School.  After law school we spent five years in the the Maryland suburbs of Washington DC and loved it.  After 8 years on the east coast we returned to Utah in 2006 so our kids could... Read more »

Kristine Haglund

January 1, 2003 | no comments
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Kristine Haglund

My name is Kristine Haglund, and yes, I’m related to all the Haglunds you’ve ever met–I’m the oldest daughter of Richard (the oldest son of Richard and Grettle of SLC) and Carol Ann, sister to Rich, Evan, J.B., and Erika, cousin to another 47 Haglunds. I’ve lived in Huntsville, Alabama; Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Los Alamos, New Mexico; Marburg, Germany; Nashville, Tennessee; Boston/Cambridge, Massachusetts; Irvine, California; Ann Arbor, Michigan; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Pleasanton, California, in roughly that order. I am also, to my continuing amazement, the mother of three adorable and highly entertaining children, Peter, Louisa, & Samuel. We... Read more »

Wilfried Decoo

January 1, 2003 | no comments
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Wilfried Decoo

I am a native of Belgium – the Flemish side. Born in 1946, I grew up in Antwerp. I obtained my B.A. from the Antwerp Jesuit University, my M.A. from Ghent University – both degrees in Romance languages. As a teacher of French and history I worked a few years in Central Africa for the Belgian Cooperation. Next I went to BYU where I finished a PhD in comparative literature. From 1974 on I spent most of my academic career at the University of Antwerp, as professor of applied linguistics and language education. In 1999 the department of French... Read more »

Rosalynde Welch

January 1, 2003 | no comments
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Rosalynde Welch

I grew up in Southern California, the daughter of Russ and Christie Frandsen and eldest of their eleven children (including Gabrielle, Naomi, Brigham, Rachel, Jacob, Benjamin, Abraham, Christian, Eva, and Isaac, in case you’re wondering if I’m related to that Frandsen you used to know). In 1992 I graduated from La Canada High School and started at BYU, where it didn’t take me long to switch from a pre-med to an English major. In 1993 and again in 1994, I spent several months in England studying literature and theater with, among other able teachers, Eugene England. I developed interests... Read more »

Jim Faulconer

January 1, 2003 | no comments
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Jim Faulconer

Jim Faulconer is a professor of philosophy at Brigham Young University, the husband of Janice Allen, the father of four and grandfather of eight, and the Gospel Doctrine teacher in his ward. His academic specialty is 20th-century European philosophy, particulary the philosophy of Martin Heidegger and some of his French acolytes. His hobbies are playing with grandchildren, cooking (and, therefore, also eating), travel, and New Testament studies, and for none of them is there sufficient time. Among his other trials as a professor, he taught philosophy to Greg, Nate and Russell, who are co-bloggers at T&S. Web page: http://JamesFaulconer.byu.edu... Read more »