The Polygamists are Coming!

May 25, 2004 | 8 comments
By

A couple of months ago, I made reference to a fine and informative collection of articles in the Salt Lake Tribune, titled “Living the Principle: Polygamy on the Border”. Among the many fascinating tidbits included in those reports were descriptions of tensions and splits among the Fundamentalist Latter Day Saints. It appears that the current FLDS leader, Warren Jeffs, has become unpopular and tyrannical, and several polygamist families, led by those whom he’s excommunicated or simply by folks who want to get away from the man, are relocating. (I found to my surprise that one divided faction has put down roots in a small community just over the Idaho border in British Columbia, which would be about seven miles from our family cabin.) Anyway, my friend Scott in Texas informs me that at least one small West Texas town is in an uproar over the possibility that the FLDS are considering a mass exodus to their backyard. Fortunately, according to the news article, the local townsfolk are ready: “For one man, frontier justice would serve as a reliable last resort if things got out of hand. ‘I’m just gonna keep my gun loaded. We take care of ourselves here. Always have, always will,’ Mike Calcote said.”

Tags:

8 Responses to The Polygamists are Coming!

  1. Kim Siever on May 25, 2004 at 7:29 pm

    “I found to my surprise that one divided faction has put down roots in a small community just over the Idaho border in British Columbia”

    Are you serious? They’ve been there for years.

  2. William Morris on May 25, 2004 at 9:28 pm

    From ages 4-12 I lived in Kanab which is near Hilldale/Colorado City. My father tried to set up a law practice there [he was part of the first graduating class of J. Reuben Clark]. I have a distant memory that he was involved in some way in the legal aftermath when a young woman tried to run away from Colorado City in the late ’70s or early ’80s. I have this faint memory of picturing a teenage girl hiding in sage brush near a dry creekbed.

    That image — whether based on something that happened or not — has colored my perception of the FLDS in adult life. I can’t shake it even thought it’s not something I actually saw.

  3. Charles Sakai on May 25, 2004 at 9:44 pm

    Gasp! All too many reporters to this day have trouble distinguishing between mainstream LDS and FLDS members. I don’t think this situation will change anytime soon.

  4. Jettboy on May 27, 2004 at 1:48 am

    That last sentence about keeping a gun nearby is more troubling to me than polygamy. Only proves that Frontier Justice is still very much in the 21st Century. Funny thing is that I could actually hear the stereotypical Southern twang in the quote.

    Then again, I have heard that Texas and the South never really got out of the 19th Century.

  5. Sheri Lynn on May 27, 2004 at 5:14 am

    Leave them alone
    and they will come Home
    bringing their tails (and tails, and tails,
    and tails, and tails, and tails, and tails)
    behind them.

    I have many friends in other churches who are going to be so suprised that they missed out on the fullness of the Gospel because they picked the wrong church and wrong lifestyle. I don’t see how these folks are any different. They just aren’t listening to the correct prophet, so how can they help but have some incorrect doctrine?

    If they’re supporting their own kids and not abusing anybody, kidnapping or imprisoning anyone, leave them alone. They will be judged just as the rest of us are, for the sins they actually committed knowingly without repenting.

  6. Doc on May 31, 2004 at 4:50 pm

    A very wise man once said, “Judge not that ye be not judged.” I like Sheri Lynn’s comments on judgement. Leave judgement with the Judge of all . . .

  7. Doc on May 31, 2004 at 4:52 pm

    A very wise man once said, “Judge not that ye be not judged.” I like Sheri Lynn’s comments on judgement. Leave judgement with the Judge of all . . .

  8. Doc on May 31, 2004 at 4:52 pm

    A very wise man once said, “Judge not that ye be not judged.” I like Sheri Lynn’s comments on judgement. Leave judgement with the Judge of all . . .